Feed My Sheep

At that time, Jesus revealed himself again to his disciples at the Sea of Tiberias.
He revealed himself in this way.
Together were Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus,
Nathanael from Cana in Galilee,
Zebedee’s sons, and two others of his disciples.
Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.”
They said to him, “We also will come with you.”
So they went out and got into the boat,
but that night they caught nothing.
When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore;
but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus.

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Annunciation

When I’ve given presentations on the art of the Annunciation, the painting that is most universally admired is the version by the African American artist, Henry Ossawa Tanner (b.1859-1937). People appreciate it perhaps because of its realism, the beauty of its warm golden light, and the humanity and humility with which Tanner portrayed the teenaged Mary.

The angel Gabriel was sent from God
to a town of Galilee called Nazareth,
to a virgin betrothed to a man named Joseph,
of the house of David,
and the virgin’s name was Mary.
And coming to her, he said,
“Hail, full of grace! The Lord is with you.”
But she was greatly troubled at what was said
and pondered what sort of greeting this might be.

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Divine Mercy Sunday

I must admit at the outset here that I’m not a true devotee of the Divine Mercy Apostolate. As an art historian, I view the Divine Mercy images as ‘Bad Catholic Art’. However, since this is Divine Mercy Sunday, I thought this article about the origins of the image(s) might be of interest to my readers, both Catholic and non-Catholic.

Why So Many Images? Which One is ‘Best’? Dr. Robert Stackpole Answers Your Questions on Divine Mercy

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Here’s pleasant music with a lyric video to pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy.